a martian education

Linking this haibun to dVerse Poets pub where Frank Tassone is our host…


 

Mars, that ready, ruddy, rusty, dusty planet hangs between Earth and Jupiter; named for the Roman god of War. We contemplate his heavenly body in the mighty month of March: muscular, iron clad, and vengeful.  Is not war an erupting march to madness, leaving black death and blood-stained pockmarks in its wake?!

Violent dust storms, extreme seasons, and an atmosphere of carbon dioxide make Mars inhospitable yet aerospace scientists dream of manned flights to the fourth planet. My sons participated in a Mars project where 6th graders designed a biosphere for future immigrants. We once visited an abandoned biosphere in Arizona where personnel’s’ personal relationships were the demise of the mission.

Ray Bradbury’s Martian Chronicles and C.S. Lewis’ Space Trilogy put science fiction on the cultural map, stretching literary minds and stirring curiosity in our celestial, terrestrial neighbor beyond our moon. In Lewis’ Out of the Silent Planet, Oyarsa, the ruling power of Malacandra (a.k.a. Mars), declares,

”The weakest of my people does not fear death. It is the Bent One, the lord of your world, who wastes your lives and befouls them with flying from what you know will overtake you in the end. If you were subjects of Maleldil [God of Malacandra] you would have peace.”

 

mars’ olympus mons;

civilization’s high peak–

active volcano?

mars

image courtesy of NASA

climate change

I’m linking this “sun/Son” quadrille (44 words) to  dVerse Poets pub   where we’re diving into the subject of climate crisis this week…


 

powerful star
commands our
entire system solar

glorious light
shines too bright
for human sight

his light maintains
so life sustains
planet’s green plains

will we war
for what we adore?
been done before

apostasy done
spiritual war won
when earth falls into sun

 

 

“Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.”  (Psalm 2:12 KJV)

shine light in darkness

Frank J. Tassone hosts haibuns at dVerse Poets on Hiroshima Day, 2018.

hiroshima_peace_memorial_ceremony_peace_message_lantern_floating_ceremony_01

Hiroshima Memorial Ceremony

Reading a thin volume, Hiroshima, in high school, I experienced the mushrooming disturbance to our world. Horror, regret, tragedy and fear seared my mind as images of devastation burned into my imagination. An unthinkable calculation dropped this surreal weapon of ghastly power on unsuspecting civilians. 

Visiting Pearl Harbor as an adult, I attempted to understand the whys of warfare. An over-reaching dictator and ultra-ambitious military attacked unsuspecting soldiers, provoking enmity. Havoc, death and destruction ensued, trailing a bloody wake across the “Pacific” (sadly ironic) theater. 

Until it finally ended with not one, but two, atomic bombs. Who fully realized the fallout of unleashing such force? Acts of war escalate exponentially, beyond all expectations of reasonable retaliation. Let ugly history be our strict teacher and awful memory be our future deterrence.

 

land of rising sun

lanterns floating on water

lit with hopes for peace

 

 

 

elemental valor

Linking to Haiku Horizons prompt: forge

 

as blizzard winds roar

think washington’s army in

valley forge winter

 

 

5_revwar_10

March to Valley Forge by Wm.Trego, 1883.  mountvernon.org

salaam/shalom (be upon you)

 

pray in darkest hour

clouds gather on winds of war

await dawn’s faint light

 

as shalom reigns in heaven

may Your peace rain down on earth

__________________

This episode of CDHWT takes you to the “as is above, as below” (a very explicit religious proverb) in haiku…