haloed moisture

 

round porthole window

hazy, lazy, crazy moon

holds back rain’s curtain

 

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photo (enhanced) by lynn

welcome showers

 

the sound of rain smiles

pattering steady on roof

sleep rolls us over

autumn fullness

photo credit:  “wet leaves” by David Slotto,  featured at dVerse  (too late to link post)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

color-full ideas

ripen with passing season

inspiration rains/reigns

poet living inside head

forgets to water houseplants

romantics die gently

See CDHK special, Japanese Poetry in the Lowlands, featuring Jeanine Hoedemaker


 

intermittent rain

old lovers exchange warm kiss

under umbrella

pit, pit, patter of raindrops

two hearts offbeat together

pitter~patter

Theme at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai is “power of words”: let the rain kiss you

 

“Let the rain kiss you. Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops. Let the rain sing you a lullaby.”   ~Langston Hughes

 

pack to go camping

forecast predicts rain showers

great sleeping weather

 

delirium in dirt

Not sure if this would be considered haiku (nature)or senryu (human nature).

 

moonlight stirs crazy

work late against chance of rain

farmer digs darkness

 

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photo by lynn

pond(ering) pageantry

Painters and poets learn by “copying” (imitating style of) the masters!

 

mandarin duck –
rain falls silently
from an oak

© Yosa Buson (1716-1783)

mandarin ducks glide

silent in feathered beauty

watercolor  rain

c) lynn__

mandarin-ducks_000589

Photo / inspiration from Carpe Diem Haiku Kai 

empty comes full circle

At Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, Chèvre challenges us to use these 12 words in order (one per line) in a haiku series (like 12 hours in full circle of clock):  1. summer  2. princess  3. willow  4. oasis  5. palmtree(s)  6. camels  7. cruise-ship  8. snow  9. rainbow  10. yellow  11. shrine  12. prayer (or praying)


 

sultry summer birth
dark-eyed princess baby girl
thin as willow wisp

parents’ oasis
simple hut under palm trees
daughter worth camels

poverty’s cruise-ship
huddle near fire when snow falls
wishing on rainbow

yellow fever strikes
bury princess near old shrine
praying in the rain

 

 

yokoburi at risefest

The Japanese, who invented haiku, are so “tuned in” to weather and seasonal changes that they actually have 50 different words for rain!  Yokoburi means “driving rain”, as Toni explains at dVerse Poets while serving up haibuns.

 

The northern sky looks dark but we clutch our tickets and lawn chairs, scanning the crowd for an open spot of grass. Undiminished by wringer of day’s work in humidity, we feel pumped for loud, driving beats of drums and bass guitar. A preliminary speaker takes the stage; her enthusiasm covers as a squall stall. Restless for concert to begin, we leave our chairs to search for supper among the vendor stands: pizza by the slice, walking tacos, churro bites, BBQ beef or bratz on bun, cookie on a stick, warm funnel cakes and cold lemonade. We chat with a mom and her stepsons at our picnic table; sharing napkins, talking about noisy boys. Then we wander back to our seats as band takes the stage, under threatening clouds. Let the music begin! Two songs in, clapping crowd is hushed by announcement to go to our cars as a storm is rolling in. A controlled chaos ensues as a thousand people simultaneously fold up camp and head for the parking lot. A strong gust of wind pushes us over tangled net fences to the relative shelter of our cars. A wild prairie storm steals show as headliner tonight.

outdoor concert rips

rain blows across tattered stage

hail drums staccato

hope springs eternal

SONY DSC

photo credit: MARKOVICH PHOTO ART

Doesn’t this beautiful photo of apple blossoms on orange background lift one’s spirit?  One more day of NaPoWriMo challenge to write 30 poems in 30 days!  A lot of mine were haiku/haiga  🙂

 

lanes open at 4 a.m.

 

thunder bowls on roof

lightning scores strike across lawn

rain cheers at windows

 

find your ball and pay for shoes

no one can sleep in alley!

 

weather the weather

nonet: stanza(s) of nine lines, each with increasing # of syllables (1-9)    dVerse poetics


warm

days of

november

probably past

colder times ahead

forecast fog, wet grey rain

free- zing  an- ti- ci- pa- tion

smell of manure spread on bare fields

trees’ silhouettes swallowed by swift night

photo by lynn

photo by lynn

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