psalm for earth day

Psalm 104 is a poem that celebrates creation! I write a humble triolet for earth day. Okay, I’m a day late but to a farmer every day is earth day, right?!

 

bless the Lord who forms the earth
he calls us to be caretakers
let creatures thrive, let life give birth

bless the Lord who forms the earth
air, water, soils of priceless worth
forgive us wasteful mess makers

bless the Lord who forms the earth
he calls us to be caretakers

 

images

free image – liturgy website

looking for eden

caretakers of earth

placed in garden for purpose

listen to the soil

all creatures on green planet

need resources to sustain

IMG_1148

photo by lynn

thankful tanka

sunshine’s steady warmth

melting snow, nourishing soil

vital nitrogen

_____

listen to weather’s whisper

nature’s cycle of blessing

IMG_5917

photo by lynn

november colors dakota

 

honk gray geese vee tattoo

across low-flying sky’s ceiling.

 

ice-edged blue pond fingers

reedy border of dry wild rice.

 

undulating green winter wheat field

interrupted by bare windbreak.

 

peely red shed leans lopsided into

prevailing prairie headwinds.

 

buff-brown buck grazes placidly

among herd of hardy range cattle.

 

flap black crow caws contrary to

silently melting snow pile.

 

tufted straw-gold crop debris

disk-mixed into fallow, fertile soil.

 

sunny silver beams gleam earthward

 between radiant cracks in clouds.

 

inspired white church steeple points

gratefully back toward heaven.

 

falling for autumn

This haiku writing technique is often given poet Masaoka Shiki’s term Shasei (sketch from life) or Shajitsu (reality). The poetic principle is “to depict the thing just as it is”. Shiki favored the quiet simplicity of just stating what he saw without anything else happening in the haiku. He found the greatest beauty in the common sight, simply reported exactly as it was seen, and ninety-nine percent of his haiku was written in this style. Many people still feel he was right; there are some moments that are perhaps best said as simply as possible.

(above text taken from Carpe Diem Haiku Kai)

photo by lynn

I.

thin rain mists the ground

wet leaves from denuded trees

black soil’s damp compost

IMG_2615

II.

sun rays between trees

light cast upon maple limbs

golden leaves tremble

(photos by lynn)

a piece of land

I.

Look across heartland’s dry

acres of

 

dirt.

 

 

II.

Precious prairie humus

treasured black

 

loam.

 

 

III.

Heavy downpour cuts land,

stealing rich

 

soil.

 

 

_________

 

Link to d’Verse with Kelvin’s original “Tilus” form of 3 lines: 6, 3, 1 syllable each.

“Tilus” (tee-loo-hz) means  “piece of land” (Finnish) so that’s where I went, naturally.